Why Preservation Matters?: Introducing Louise Burgess

Blog entry by Louise Burgess

“The mother art is architecture. Without an architecture of our own
we have no soul of our own civilization.” – Frank Lloyd Wright

"It takes energy to construct a new building. It saves energy to preserve and old one." Image Source: National Trust for Historic Preservation

“It takes energy to construct a new building.
It saves energy to preserve and old one.”
Image Source: National Trust for Historic Preservation

Why should we preserve the architecture of the past?
Why will its preservation matter to our future?

The idea to preserve buildings, communities and landscapes isn’t a new one though it is a growing. It also is a topic that has so many facets it would be impossible to do justice to the scope of historic preservation in one blog. What we do want to do is to create a forum that invites all aspects of historic preservation into one usable tool. A resource for homeowners, people in the building trades and realtors to come for ideas and the tools they need to maintain a buildings historic character. That is what we aim for this blog to become. Please join in on our conversations and share why preservation matters to you.

Continue reading

Eastfield Village: An Educational Opportunity Like None Other

2009 10 21 Image 01I went to some wonderful workshops at Eastfield Village . As described in previous blog entry “Eastfield Village: Total Immersion Into The Past”, Eastfield Village is a long journey from Portland, Oregon, but it is an educational opportunity like none other. Classes are held in various buildings throughout the village, but many take place in the 1836 Universalist Greek Revival church Don Saved. He has restored it to include it’s original gallery, so students can sit both upstairs and down.

Continue reading

Eastfield Village: Total Immersion Into The Past

2009 10 06 Image 01In the quest for unique and in depth educational opportunities, I signed up for several workshops at Eastfield village, which is located near the small town of Nassau in Upstate New York. Don Carpentier rescued numerous early buildings and set up workshops on a large variety of early american crafts. He has created an educational opportunity like none other.

Continue reading